Applied Maths

Applied maths is the use of mathematics in studying natural phenomena. The branch of applied maths studied for Leaving Cert is Newtonian mechanics. Mechanics is the study of systems under the action of forces. Newtonian mechanics is concerned with systems that can be adequately described by Newton’s Laws of Motion. Not all systems can be  adequately described by Newtonian mechanics, for example, systems with speeds approaching the speed of light, systems of extremely small particles and systems with a large number of particles. Hence Leaving Cert Applied Maths is the study of simple macro-systems that have moderate speeds.

Linear Motion 1

Linear motion 2

Linear motion 3

Linear motion Catch up

Engineers Ireland Applied Maths revision videos  videos each between 40 and 47 minutes long.

Exam Breakdown Higher Level

Applied Maths Higher Level  
Topic Question
Uniform linear acceleration  1
Relative velocity 2
Projectiles 3
Connected particles; pulleys & wedges 4
Impacts & Collisions 5
Circular motion & simple harmonic motion 6
Statics 7
Moments of inertia and rotating bodies 8
Hydrostatics 9
Differential Equations 10
Exam duration 2 hours 30 minutes (300 marks in total)
Six questions to be answered. All questions carry equal marks.

Exam Breakdown Ordinary Level

Applied Maths Ordinary Level  
Topic Question
Uniform linear acceleration  1
Relative velocity 2
Projectiles 3
Connected particles; pulleys & wedges 4
Impacts & Collisions 5
Circular motion & simple harmonic motion 6
Statics (Forces and Friction) 7
Centripetal force Circular motion 8
Hydrostatics 9
Exam duration 2 hours 30 minutes (300 marks in total)
Six questions to be answered. All questions carry equal marks.

Interesting Information

Applied Mathematics is a subject that combines many real life applications of maths and physics. This subject can be a good complimentary subject for students who excel in both Maths and Physics and can be a beneficial subject for getting additional points in the Leaving Certificate.

Applied maths brings the principles of maths and science into everyday use with questions on projectiles, fluids etc.

Why might you choose Applied Maths?

  • If you are are getting A or B grades in Maths and Physics, you should be capable of getting similar grades in Applied Maths thus enabling you to increase your points in the Leaving Cert.
  • There is overlap between some parts of the Leaving Cert Physics course and the Applied Maths course, such as Linear Motion, Newton’s Laws, and Circular Motion. Thus it will also help you have a deeper understanding of these topics in Physics.
  • As there is a high Maths content in the course it will also give you a better understanding of some parts of the Honours Maths course – especially Trigonometry, Calculus (Differentiation and Integration) and Vectors.
  • It is ideal for students who may be weak at other subjects (such as languages) and good at Maths as they can do honours Applied Maths to increase their points  .
  • It is very possible to cover the whole course in one year if a student is committed. Thus if you are starting Leaving Cert year, it is not too late to start.
  • If you are considering studying any kind of engineering in college, Applied Maths is very important – all engineering students have to study Applied Maths in first year in college and you will have a head start if you have the Leaving Cert course done.
  • TCD accepts Applied maths as a science subject for entry into both the science and pharmacy faculties! BEWARE: For TCD it cannot be used as a second science subject when the first is maths.

Third Level Entry Requirements

This subject is not an essential requirement for any courses in the CAO system

Statistics

In 2011 a total of 1213 students took Applied Mathematics at Leaving Cert. 293 girls took Applied Mathematics  at Leaving Certificate at higher level while 920 boys did Applied Mathematics at Higher Level in 2010.

  • 29.6% of students got an A
  • 25.3% of students got a B
  • 20.6% of students got a C
  • 16.5 % of students got a D
  • 7% of students failed